Three Ways To Give Constructive Feedback

I once worked for an organization where giving feedback was part of the core values. After every important meeting or presentation, my boss came into my office to give me tips for improvement. And I was expected to do the same for others. Sometimes it went over well, and sometimes not.

Giving constructive criticism can be a very sensitive area. It's an opportunity to identify areas of improvement, but it can also mean bruising an ego here or there.

In her recent blog post from The Muse, author Kat Boogard shared three ways to give constructive feedback, which we'll outline in this issue of Promotional Consultant Today.

1. " You always ..." Always. As Boogard says, "always' seems like such an innocent word, but when used to give feedback, it can quickly put someone on the defensive.

As she points out, "always" can imply that there's a mistake that has happened on a frequent enough basis that you can chalk it up as something that person repeatedly does. Maybe that's true. However, constructive criticism is hard enough to swallow without being made to feel like you've been making the same mistake for a long time.

So, when giving feedback, drop the "A" word.

2. "Everybody has noticed that ..." Sometimes when you receive feedback, it can feel embarrassing or disheartening, especially when you didn't realize there was a problem to begin with.

Implying that everyone has noticed will make the recipient feel like they've been talked about and that negative comments were made.

When giving feedback, there's no need to relay the details of every single complaint. In the end, it shouldn't matter how many people have commented. What matters is that the person is aware that he or she needs to fix it.

3. "If I were you ..." Constructive criticism is generally better received when it's rooted in fact-as opposed to just opinion. This phrase, "If I were you ..." can come across as judgmental.

Remember, not everybody works the same way, which means that just because you'd do something differently doesn't necessarily mean the way that other person is doing it is wrong and warrants correction.

Providing feedback can be a positive discussion and an effective step toward improvement. By demonstrating respect and basing feedback on facts, not judgement or opinion, you'll create a positive foundation for next steps to improvement.

Source: Kat Boogard is a Midwest-based freelance writer, covering topics related to careers, self-development and the freelance life. In addition to writing for The Muse, she's also the Career Editor for The Everygirl, a columnist for Inc., and a contributor on the web. When she manages to escape from behind her computer screen, she's usually babying her rescued terrier mutt or continuing her search for the perfect taco.

 

filed under May 2018
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